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Is it fair to call the Whig Government a ‘Great Reforming Government’? (1833-41)
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Old 20 Feb 2009, 12:29   #1 (permalink)
Shas'El
 
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Default Is it fair to call the Whig Government a ‘Great Reforming Government’? (1833-41)

Hey.. this is a copy of the essay i am currently writing for history (Incredibly dull) i have got so far.. but i have just ran out of juice, ideas and have no idea how to structure it.
Any help would be cool.

In 1841, thing were looking bleak for the Whig Government. They had been in power for over 6 years and in those years they had passed reforming acts including the great reform bill. But can we call them a ‘great’ reforming government? Does changing many things make a government a great one? In order to discover the answer to this question, we need to look at different factors. These might include the morals of the government, what was the motivation to pass the act and whether or not it actually worked. In this essay I hope to asses the reasons for the Whig Government gaining the title ‘Great reforming government’ and decide whether I agree or disagree the with reasons.

In 1815, Lord Liverpool was the prime minister of England. But due to some of his acts and movements in parliament, he faced great unrest from the working people. By 1820, Britain was in a dire situation, riots and rebellion ripped through the country. By the late 1820’s, Lord Wellington of the Tory Government had come to power and he had managed to restore order to the country bit by bit. He had introduced Catholic emancipation that had satisfied the Catholics and other acts had appeased other parties. But this would not stop the Whig Government Coming to power in 1830.
In 1833, Earl grey led the Whig government in finally passing the Great reform Act; this introduced a great many new members into parliament from the middle class. From here on, the Whig Governments priorities turned as the new voters bought a new perspective onto the scene.

From 1833 to their end time in parliament, the Whig governments passed a total of 13 acts and introduced much new legislature. The Factory act had made it better for women and children in Britain’s primary industries of textiles and linen mills. It did not cover however the large majority of other people who did not work in the factories but instead in equally important jobs such as farming and mining. This year also saw the first government educational grant. This was a great change for education in England and was a cornerstone in history.

The Whig government oversaw the abolition of the Slave Trade in the British Empire in 1833 also. This was a massive step on the way to equality for all, which would come many years later.

The Whig government had made it easier and more convenient for other denominations of Christianity to get married; for example, the marriage act of 1824 meant that ‘non conformists’ could get married and legally recognised in their own church. Similarly to the abolition of slave trade, this was a large step on the way to equality which could be built on by later governments.


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Old 20 Feb 2009, 12:52   #2 (permalink)
Ethereal
 
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Default Re: Is it fair to call the Whig Government a ‘Great Reforming Government’? (1833-41)

I'll start by mentioning that I have no idea what this is about, but I'll try to clear it up a bit. Changes are in bold.
[hr]

In 1841, things were looking bleak for the Whig Government. They had been in power for over six years and in this time they had passed several reforming acts including the Great Reform Bill. But can we call them a ‘great’ reforming government? Does changing many things make a government a great one?
In order to discover the answer to this question, we need to look at different factors. These might include the morals of the government, the motivations for passing the act and whether or not it actually achieved what the Whig government set out to do.
In this essay I hope to offer possible explanations for the Whig government being granted the title ‘Great Reforming Government’ and decide whether I agree or disagree with these reasons.

In 1815, Lord Liverpool was the Prime Minister of England. But due to some of his acts and movements in Parliament, he faced great unrest from the working people. By 1820, Britain was in a dire situation, riots and rebellion ripped through the country. By the late 1820’s, Lord Wellington of the Tory Government had come to power and he had managed to restore order to the country bit by bit. He had introduced Catholic emancipation (descibe what this is) that had satisfied the Catholics and other acts had appeased other parties. But this would not stop the Whig Government coming to power in 1830.
In 1833, Earl Grey led the Whig government in finally passing the Great Reform Act; this introduced a great many new members into parliament from the middle class. From here on, the Whig Governments priorities changed as the new voters bought a new perspective onto the scene.

From 1833 to the end of their time in Parliament, the Whig government passed a total of 13 acts and introduced much new legislature. The Factory act for example had made conditions better for women and children in Britain’s primary industries of textiles and linen. It did not cover however the large majority of other people who did not work in the factories but instead in equally important jobs such as farming and mining. This year also saw the first government educational grant. This was a great change for education in England and was a cornerstone in history because....

The Whig government oversaw the abolition of the Slave Trade in the British Empire in 1833 also. This was a massive step on the way to equality for all, which would come many years later.

The Whig government had made it easier and more convenient for other denominations of Christianity to get married; for example, the marriage act of 1824 meant that ‘non conformists’ could get married and legally recognised in their own Church. Similarly to the abolition of slave trade, this was a large step on the way to equality which could be built on by later governments.
[hr]

Very quick changes but hope it helps a bit!
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Old 20 Feb 2009, 13:14   #3 (permalink)
Shas'El
 
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Default Re: Is it fair to call the Whig Government a ‘Great Reforming Government’? (1833-41)

Yeah cheers. I will stick these in there now!

Ok, here is an updated version so far, i manged to add a bit more on aswell. This is the whole thing so far..

In 1841, things were looking bleak for the Whig Government. They had been in power for over six years and in this time they had passed several reforming acts including the Great Reform Bill. But can we call them a ‘great’ reforming government? Does changing many things make a government a great one? In order to discover the answer to this question, we need to look at different factors. These might include the morals of the government, what were the motivations for passing the act and whether or not it actually achieved what the Whig government set out to achieve. In this essay I hope offer possible explanations for the Whig Government being granted the title ‘Great reforming government’ and decide whether I agree or disagree with these reasons.

In 1815, Lord Liverpool was the Prime Minister of England. But due to some of his acts and movements in Parliament, he faced great unrest from the working people. By 1820, Britain was in a dire situation, riots and rebellion ripped through the country. By the late 1820’s, Lord Wellington of the Tory Government had come to power and he had managed to restore order to the country bit by bit. He had introduced Catholic emancipation that had satisfied the Catholics by allowing them to sit in parliament despite them not being able to swear complete allegiance to the king. Other acts had appeased other parties. But this would not stop the Whig Government Coming to power in 1830.
In 1833, Earl Grey led the Whig government in finally passing the Great Reform Act; this introduced a great many new members into parliament from the middle class. From here on, the Whig Governments priorities changed as the new voters bought a new perspective onto the scene.

From 1833 to the end of their time in Parliament, the Whig governments passed a total of 13 acts and introduced much new legislature. The Factory act for example had made conditions better for women and children in Britain’s primary industries of textiles and linen mills. It did not cover however the large majority of other people who did not work in the factories but instead in equally important jobs such as farming and mining. This year also saw the first government educational grant. This was a great change for education in England and was a cornerstone in history. Some historians may argue that this is because it means that the governments are finally looking to the future rather than the here and now, while others say that it was the forging of the country as it is today.

The Whig government oversaw the abolition of the Slave Trade in the British Empire in 1833 also. This was a massive step on the way to equality for all, which would come many years later.

The Whig government had made it easier and more convenient for other denominations of Christianity to get married; for example, the marriage act of 1824 meant that ‘non conformists’ could get married and legally recognised in their own Church. Similarly to the abolition of slave trade, this was a large step on the way to equality, which could be built on by later governments.

I think many of these cases were passed due to pressure to please the new voters. If the people who have just received a vote and then have their lives made better, it is probably going to secure loyalty to the party that gave them the vote. As to whether the motions worked all we need to do is look at modern day politics. Things have changed and many of the modern ideas have sprung from the ideas created by the Whig Government. So in this respect, yes I do think the Whig government can be called a ‘Great reforming government’. However, we do need to look at the motivation for the government passing these acts. Was it out of general concern for the country or was it them simply trying to stay in power?

From the sources we can gather that some of the members of the government were very happy with their time in parliament, they generally thought they were making a difference while others thought that they were just fixing what other governments had done. Sir John Russell said in a letter to Edwin Chadwick in 1836 “We think they have been las, careless and wasteful… The country governed itself and was blind to its own faults” this suggests that some members thought that they were actually ‘saving’ the country from itself.
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Old 20 Feb 2009, 14:20   #4 (permalink)
Shas'O
 
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Default Re: Is it fair to call the Whig Government a ‘Great Reforming Government’? (1833-41)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris the Sweaty Man
In 1841, things were looking bleak for the Whig Government. They had been in power for over six years and in this time they had passed several reforming acts including the Great Reform Bill. But can we call them a ‘great’ reforming government? Does changing many things make a government a great one? In order to discover the answer to this question, we need to look at different factors. These might include the morals of the government, what were the motivations for passing the act and whether or not it actually achieved what the Whig government set out to achieve. In this essay I hope offer possible explanations for the Whig Government being granted the title ‘Great reforming government’ and decide whether I agree or disagree with these reasons.
Right if this is a formal eassy let's break down what the purpose of the essay is. I gather the question is;

To what extent can the 'Whig' Government between 1835 and 1841 be described as a 'great reforming government'?

Hence you introduction should link directly to the points you are going to make, in essence the introduction is a summery without conclusions of what you are going to write about. Hence your indroduction could read somewhere along the lines of;

The 'Whig' government of Great Britian can be seen to have been a great reforming government by the policies passed during their time in power, some pertaining to civil ethics and others at appeasing religious factions. At the same time did ulterior motives for their own political ambitions govern these changes of policy and so be a great reformation for the people of Great Britain during the early 1800s, and since.


See this gives the reader more idea of what the eassy is about. It's a history eassy, pertaining to the early 1800s about great britian and the policies of it's government during that time.

The next paragraph should probally go on to explain what the whig government was, who was part of it and why it got its namesake.

Then you might want to put the whole thing into a sociological context of explaining why the Tory government that preceded it lost a vote of no confidence. This then gives the reader some idea of the political feelings of the time, and hence can judge if the actions of the government were for the people, or not.

Your hinting of this here;
Quote:
In 1815, Lord Liverpool was the Prime Minister of England. But due to some of his acts and movements in Parliament, he faced great unrest from the working people. By 1820, Britain was in a dire situation, riots and rebellion ripped through the country.
But that's not an explaination and hence to a not infomed reader means nothing whatsoever.

Hence you can then break into the meat of what the Whig government did during their time in power and conclude it at the end in a historical context.

At the moment there doesn't appear to be a lot of structure to this eassy, and I don't see referances to where the infomation is coming from. If you've got this from a textbook then the textbook should have the sources it got the infomation from listed. If it is from elsewhere you need to quote those.

Otherwise the 'whig' government can be a figment of imagination with anything you care to say about it said. (It's also really impressive when you hand in ANY piece of well referanced work, because it shows your teacher that you are reading around the subject and looking analytically at multiple points of view to base your judgements about history.

I look forward to reading about the whig government in full detail,
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Old 20 Feb 2009, 19:42   #5 (permalink)
Shas'O
 
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Default Re: Is it fair to call the Whig Government a ‘Great Reforming Government’? (1833-41)

Now, I'm not well versed in this so I can't judge the historical aspect, but I will say that the fourth and fifth paragraphs are looking pretty lean. I know that proper paragraphs are open to interpretation, but I also know that many of my instructors will beat me over the brow for not including a topic, 2-3 sentences, and a conclusion for proper essay format. :P
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